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Danville: New exhibit spotlights Japanese American internment camps

Speakers, music, videos in 'Art of Survival: Enduring the Turmoil of Tule Lake'

The Museum of the San Ramon Valley showcases a new exhibit now through mid-May aiming to educate viewers on the incarceration of Japanese Americans in internment camps during World War II.

"The Art of Survival: Enduring the Turmoil of Tule Lake" will display pictures, DVDs and artifacts to tell the stories of Japanese American families who were placed into internment camps at Tule Lake.

"Tule Lake, located on the far northeast corner of California, housed the largest camps and was chosen to host a special prison for all those the army deemed the most disloyal," Eve Vojvoda, administrative director of the Museum of the San Ramon Valley, said in a press release.

As part of the exhibit, the museum will also sponsor special presentations over the next several weeks:

- This Thursday, "Baseball and Its Impact on America During WWII", 7 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Building, 400 Hartz Ave., Danville. Marty Lurie, Bay Area baseball historian, will speak about baseball during World War II, in which many of the athletes entered the service.

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Kerry Yo Nakagawa, founder of the Nisei Baseball Research Project, will talk about children and adults continuing to play baseball at internment camps.

- April 21, "Hidden Legacy," 7 p.m. at the Town Meeting Hall, 201 Front St. Shirley Muramoto Wong, an Oakland-based koto performer, will present cultural arts that evacuees took part in during their time in the camp.

- May 6, "Survive with Dignity," 7 p.m. at the Danville Library, 400 Front St. Poetry, music, film and conversations with Japanese American Army veterans will help tell the celebration of life at the internment camps.

For further information on the exhibit, visit the museum website.

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Danville: New exhibit spotlights Japanese American internment camps

Speakers, music, videos in 'Art of Survival: Enduring the Turmoil of Tule Lake'

by /

Uploaded: Tue, Apr 12, 2016, 10:53 pm

The Museum of the San Ramon Valley showcases a new exhibit now through mid-May aiming to educate viewers on the incarceration of Japanese Americans in internment camps during World War II.

"The Art of Survival: Enduring the Turmoil of Tule Lake" will display pictures, DVDs and artifacts to tell the stories of Japanese American families who were placed into internment camps at Tule Lake.

"Tule Lake, located on the far northeast corner of California, housed the largest camps and was chosen to host a special prison for all those the army deemed the most disloyal," Eve Vojvoda, administrative director of the Museum of the San Ramon Valley, said in a press release.

As part of the exhibit, the museum will also sponsor special presentations over the next several weeks:

- This Thursday, "Baseball and Its Impact on America During WWII", 7 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Building, 400 Hartz Ave., Danville. Marty Lurie, Bay Area baseball historian, will speak about baseball during World War II, in which many of the athletes entered the service.

Kerry Yo Nakagawa, founder of the Nisei Baseball Research Project, will talk about children and adults continuing to play baseball at internment camps.

- April 21, "Hidden Legacy," 7 p.m. at the Town Meeting Hall, 201 Front St. Shirley Muramoto Wong, an Oakland-based koto performer, will present cultural arts that evacuees took part in during their time in the camp.

- May 6, "Survive with Dignity," 7 p.m. at the Danville Library, 400 Front St. Poetry, music, film and conversations with Japanese American Army veterans will help tell the celebration of life at the internment camps.

For further information on the exhibit, visit the museum website.

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