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SRVUSD shows support for LGBT students with 1st-ever Day of Silence resolution

School board endorses voluntary participation, says students must talk in class if lesson requires

The National Day of Silence is set to return to some San Ramon Valley schools on Friday, but it arrives this year with an unprecedented endorsement from the school board in a show of support for students harassed because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

The student-led effort, held annually in schools locally and across the U.S., features some students taking a vow of silence for the day to bring attention to the verbal and physical bullying many lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students and their allies face on campus, using their voice -- or lack there of -- to demonstrate the silencing effects of such harassment.

"No one should ever feel unsafe, disgraced or a sense of disrespect simply for being who they are," board member Denise Jennison said through tears minutes before the board unanimously adopted its first-ever Day of Silence resolution last month.

"And I will fight tirelessly ... to make sure that our students know that whoever they are, we love them and they deserve happiness, safety and an access to an education," she added.

The Day of Silence has been recognized at San Ramon Valley high schools and middle schools in previous years, but this marks the first time the school board adopted a resolution in support of students who choose to take part in the observance.

"My message is: Day of Silence changed my life. Day of Silence made me proud to be who I am," Dougherty Valley High senior Rachel Laventure said during the school board's emotional half-hour discussion in Danville on March 8.

"It encouraged me to come out and to be comfortable with my sexual identity ... and it was just this day of clarity," added Laventure, now co-president of the school's gay-straight alliance (GSA).

During the Day of Silence, some students carry signs stating their message, put tape over their mouths or wear similar colors or symbols, all while declining to talk until the end of the day when the silence is broken, often with a shout in unison and subsequent conversations about bullying and acceptance.

"It is not a protest. It is in fact a practice of empathy," said Gary Leveque, fine arts teacher at Charlotte Wood Middle School in Danville and a GSA faculty adviser.

"This resolution will have a profound impact across our district and will raise kids up who desperately need to be lifted up," Leveque told the board. "It is our one collective, collaborative opportunity as a district -- as an entire district -- to reach out, to extend our hand to the individuals that we refer to as silent voices. Those students who feel they have no voice."

In their resolution, board members declared support for students who choose to voluntarily take part in the Day of Silence, while also acknowledging they were not requiring any student or employee to participate.

The resolution states that the observance would not alter classroom instruction on Friday, but it encouraged teachers "to be thoughtful and sensitive as they create lesson plans." Students must contribute verbally in class if such participation is part of the required class lesson.

Lessons focused on LGBT awareness have been a source of debate at San Ramon's Windemere Ranch Middle School after school officials announced plans to hold an "Acceptance Week" all this week during the lead-up to the Day of Silence.

An online petition developed from parents opposed to the optional week-long activities, though the petition is no longer accessible on the host website, change.org.

As of Wednesday, 206 students had opted out of Windemere Ranch's "Acceptance Week" activities, which occur in the 27-minute academic prep period at the end of the school day, according to district spokeswoman Elizabeth Graswich. Non-participating students can either head home or go to the multipurpose room to do what they'd normally do during the period, such as study or complete homework.

In its Day of Silence resolution, the school board asserted "(the) district believes it is our obligation to promote mutual respect, tolerance and acceptance on all our campuses and to always intervene and stop bullying and hateful comments."

GSA student-leaders who spoke to the board in March said they hoped the resolution raises heightened awareness about what Day of Silence represents and educates non-participating students and community members.

Those unaware people, according to Dougherty Valley GSA co-president Kyle Doan, sometimes question the silent observance: "Why are they doing this? Is it just a gay thing? Why do they have to be so out about it? Why do they have to be so vocal about it -- even though, that's sort of ironic."

"What I wanted from this, " Doan added, "is that I want people to not necessarily understand, but to begin to understand. Because everyone has to start somewhere, and high school is a great place to open your mind up to different things. High school is great place to kind of expand your perspective."

Laventure added, "When the day comes and you see all these students participating and all of these staff encouraging this participation and your principal endorsing it, it's just this feeling of, 'Oh, OK, I'm in a safe environment. I have people who are going to support me.'"

Leveque said he hoped the resolution would also empower bullied students "to be your authentic self" and to "call out the bigots, call out the fear-based ignorance that is projected on us day after day."

The district-level endorsement will especially hit home with local LGBT students who have been shunned by their families and kicked out of their houses and onto friends' couches or the streets because of their identities, many with parents who tell them, "You'd be better off dead than gay," Leveque said.

For those students faced with isolation, depression or suicidal thoughts, seeing their peers and teachers show support during the Day of Silence provides a powerful message, according to Leveque.

"The message is: You matter," he added. "To take your life is not a choice we want to support. We are here for you. You are not alone."

"Six different students have said to me over the last 16 years, looked me in the eye and said, 'You saved my life,'" Leveque said. "We've saved lives ... and that, to me, is what the Day of Silence is first and foremost about."

Closing out the discussion, school board president Greg Marvel said, "It's taken a long time to get to where we are today, and the effort, the fight, is not over yet."

"I will not rest until every child -- and I think the rest of the board feels this way -- until every child can walk through our doors, wherever they are, whatever school ... and feel they're able to come and have an equal learning opportunity, an equal safe environment compared to every other child in the district," Marvel added.

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Comments

17 people like this
Posted by Arlene
a resident of Diablo
on Apr 15, 2016 at 7:10 am

Hurrah!! Great news that the students and the SRVSD are giving their support to "Day of Silence" to develop awareness of LGBT issues and to show solidarity with them.


14 people like this
Posted by Bill
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 7:13 am

Excellent topic to show that the right wing of intolerance is alive and well in the San Ramon Valley. I am proud the Board of Education stood up and took a stand against this intolerant minority that has views that show that high intelligence is not indicative of social maturity.


19 people like this
Posted by kim
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 8:54 am

Bravo! I heartily support this action by SRVUSD. (And by the way, I am a conservative Republican...)


23 people like this
Posted by Long term resident
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 9:23 am

Before Bill gets too worked up and accuses others of intolerance, he might want to consider if he is being the one who us intolerant. Some of the fools who are objecting or not participating in this activity may be doing so for religious or spiritual reasons. In that case, Bill is the one being intolerant of allowing them to practice their religion or act in a manner consistent with their own values.

I have plenty of gay friends and consider myself very open minded since I have also lived in other parts of the world and travelled extensively. It always amazes me how folks who view themselves as liberals are in many cases less accepting of other's values and actions if they don't perfectly align with their own.


2 people like this
Posted by I hope long term resident leaves
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 10:40 am

[Post removed due to offensive language]


15 people like this
Posted by District Teacher
a resident of San Ramon
on Apr 15, 2016 at 10:46 am

Long term resident, religion is no longer an acceptable excuse for intolerance and bigotry. Religion was also used in support of slavery, segregation, and anti-miscegenation laws.

We often assume that we live in an open-minded community, and that issues like racism, bigotry, and homophobia are reserved for the "fly over" states. Sadly, the parent reaction at Windemere and similar parent reactions to Day of Silence at my school and others shows that this is not the case.


22 people like this
Posted by Resident 1
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 3:40 pm

No matter what your view, has anybody wondered if this is a topic that may not be suitable for middle school? Just curious. Should 11 year olds be asked to participate in discussions regarding sex, including homosexual and heterosexual? And for an entire week, let alone just a single day? I asked, hopefully there are some educated responses. Thank you.


20 people like this
Posted by Parent of graduated students
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 4:17 pm

Being a parent of a LBG student who graduated from the SRVUSD I just wanted to say there is always the statement we can agree to disagree. Many LGBT students know well before middle school who they are and that they are different. Acceptance is all we ask.....Just because you or your neighbors may not agree with a certain aspect of life what you are teaching your children is that the LGBT community is different. That perhaps in your mind they are not an equal to you. Your actions speak louder than your words and what you do and say stay in the minds of YOUR children. It is sometimes those children that bully others. In 1963 when I was in 3rd grade white people did not invite black people to birthday parties...my mother taught me we are all the same and EVERYONE in my class would be attending, white, black, brown whatever...to respect each other is a great thing.


2 people like this
Posted by Anne
a resident of Alamo
on Apr 15, 2016 at 4:41 pm

I think this is a very good idea BUT I also hope that soon we won't need to single out ANYONE who is different from us.Some day, differences will become moot.
Rhetorical question here: Bruce Springsteen cancelled a planned,already sold out concert in MS because of legislation supporting religious differences in that state.So,my question is: how is that refusal of service any different than refusing to cater a gay wedding?


6 people like this
Posted by SHale99
a resident of another community
on Apr 15, 2016 at 7:31 pm

SHale99 is a registered user.

Waiting to 'educate' kids about sex until HS is looney. Middle school or earlier is best. allow the 'scared' parents to pull their children that day/week; hopefully that will make them less scared and naïve.


6 people like this
Posted by A "minority"
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 7:33 pm

I looked up the word, "disagree" in my thesaurus.
I could not find the words "homophobia, bigotry, intolerance, racism
associated with it.


12 people like this
Posted by resident 1
a resident of Danville
on Apr 15, 2016 at 8:14 pm

To District Teacher,

Singling out "fly over "states, as you suggest, contradicts your point. Grow up, you lose. I have many friends and family members in the "fly over "states who are kind, caring, and tolerant. You, teacher, are just the opposite.


15 people like this
Posted by American
a resident of Danville
on Apr 16, 2016 at 7:31 am

All bullying, name calling, etc is wrong, and there should simply be a " Golden Rule" rule that if you treat someone with disrespect you are in trouble. We do not need to make it solely about being a LGBT issue, or show middle school kids a video of same sex students kissing. This is one of the problems with US public schools, we spend to much time appeasing special interest groups and not enough on math & science. If we are going to show a video of same sex students kissing, than we should also show video of Christian students saying they are not going to have sex till after marriage, and videos of every other possible special interest group that is ever treated badly. By giving one special interest the day we open up the door to every special interest group. We should simply require schools to enforce " the golden rule", treat everyone the way you want to be treated, and if you bully or treat someone with disrespect For ANY REASON you are in trouble, period. Don't single out one type of bad behavior, and get back to teaching science and math, and not pandering to every special group demanding we watch their video.


5 people like this
Posted by SHale99
a resident of another community
on Apr 16, 2016 at 5:04 pm

SHale99 is a registered user.

If a 'special interest' is having an event or a 'special' day and you don't agree, wouldn't you just ignore said event and do your own thing vs trying to tear down the 'special interest'?
Just saying


3 people like this
Posted by Danvillemommy
a resident of Danville
on Apr 16, 2016 at 8:30 pm

SHALE99,

Do you always post and then contradict your first post with a new post? Or, can you not make up your mind? Or are you just being silly?

First, you shame the parents who opt out of "ignore" LGBT week.

Then, you suggest that you should ignore something you do not agree with.

Make up your mind.

In addition, you state, "tear down the special interest". Where was that stated?

You are a special kind of confused.


2 people like this
Posted by SHale99
a resident of another community
on Apr 17, 2016 at 8:23 am

SHale99 is a registered user.

DM: Huh? I shame no one. And perhaps you should read the thread a bit slower next time.
Always amazes me those who have an 'issue' with an event that doesn't effect them directly. and instead of just going on with their day, they verbalize their 'discomfort'. Just ignore said event and don't spend any energy on it. If you are a 'parent' then make sure you kids don't see the 'event'. That's it.
Why spend so much time and energy with something that isn't your 'thing'? And by you I mean the naysayers and busy bodies here.


2 people like this
Posted by Steven o
a resident of Danville
on Apr 17, 2016 at 10:12 am

It's voluntary. Kids can make their own decisions whether to participate. All good. 11 year olds today are what I was at 13 in the 80's. Times have changed. They are no longer sheltered from these issues until they are teenagers. We need to accept that fact and act accordingly.


13 people like this
Posted by Danville Resident
a resident of Blackhawk
on Apr 18, 2016 at 7:13 am

@Anne
I think the answer to your question is that religion is a belief that can be manipulated however the people running it decide. It's the perfect platform to issue directives of approval and non approval. I'm pretty sure there is science that confirms that people are gay by birth not by choice. I don't believe that most people would line up to be discriminated against if they could help it.


7 people like this
Posted by District Teacher
a resident of San Ramon
on Apr 18, 2016 at 9:27 am

Dear "resident 1",

You completely, utterly missed my point. My point was not to single out those states for any beliefs people there might possess, but rather to point out that many in California do just that and have a false sense that everyone is open-minded here. Intolerance and bigotry are just as much of an issue in our state as any other.

The only one losing here is the one who misinterprets what someone else posts and then proceeds to attack their kindness and tolerance.


13 people like this
Posted by Marie
a resident of Diablo
on Apr 18, 2016 at 10:01 am

Long term resident: I couldn’t have said it better, thank you!

District Teacher: what religion supported slavery? Where in the bible does it say that? I’m glad Windemere parents stood up for what they believe in, haters need to stop pushing their opinions on others! YOU ARE A TEACHER, TEACH DON’T PREACH!

Resident 1: you are correct, this topic is not appropriate for MS! If a parent disagrees, they can do whatever they want in their own house/family.

Parent of graduated students: although my religion tells me this topic is forbidden, I DO treat everyone with kindness and respect. If a LGBT makes me uncomfortable, then I just move on! I agree that everyone should be accepting, but everyone also has the right to choose their friends.

Anne: everyone has the right (or should have the right) to do what they want. If Springsteen wants to cancel a concert, it’s his prerogative; same for a caterer. But let’s flip your question…Why should someone who bought a ticket have to lose out because of his opinion? Why would a person want to use a caterer who doesn’t want to work for them?

SHale99: (1) there is a difference between sex ed and telling a child they have to accept what their religion tells them is wrong! (2) Students shouldn’t be missing a day (or week) of school for this topic. Schools need to teach the basics & leave life styles out. (3) We can’t go on with our day when the SRVUSD is pushing this down our throats! Maybe they should go on with their day by teaching our kids how to become successful adults. Maybe they should be tolerant of our opinions. I don’t want to spend any more time on this, so stop making this an issue! As American said, teach the Golden Rule, no personal opinions! Done!

American: absolutely & perfectly said!


6 people like this
Posted by collins
a resident of Danville
on Apr 18, 2016 at 11:23 am

I think many of the people posting on this thread need to understand the difference between sex and gender. They are two different things. Most middle schoolers understand this difference, maybe you should ask one.

I am happy that some of us are able to accept the difference in all of us.


5 people like this
Posted by Anne
a resident of Alamo
on Apr 18, 2016 at 12:56 pm

Marie: that was exactly my point.In cancelling his concert,Springstein got HIS point across.And,in refusing service the caterer got his/her point across.Yet,the REAL caterer,a bakery owner was fined by the state in which he had his bakery,was sued by the potential customer,etc. They lost their business and had their bank accounts seized by the state ( presumably to pay their fine).And yet,Springstein,whose "customers" had already bought his "product",came out a hero.
What I am saying is this: there isn't a RIGHT or WRONG side on this issue.If you don't agree with an idea/action,etc.don't try to shove your POV down someone else's throat.We see this in politics all the time. There is really no such thing as a black/white issue,just shades of gray.
Unfortunately,our society is too busy "shaming" what,in essence,is an opinion.There used to be a time when we'd agree to disagree and let it go at that. IMO,we are becoming a very cruel society.


2 people like this
Posted by Marie
a resident of Danville
on Apr 18, 2016 at 2:16 pm

Anne: thank you for the clarification, I agree. We should all live our own lives and if we disagree with someone, have a healthy debate or move on!


3 people like this
Posted by District Teacher
a resident of San Ramon
on Apr 18, 2016 at 3:02 pm

Marie,

Instead of spending the time giving you a history education, simply Google "how the bible was used to support slavery" and you will find multiple examples and direct quotes from the bible that were indeed used for that very purpose. Here's a small sample: "They asked who could question the Word of God when it said, "slaves, obey your earthly masters with fear and trembling" (Ephesians 6:5), or "tell slaves to be submissive to their masters and to give satisfaction in every respect" (Titus 2:9)."

Oh, I'm sorry. Is it preaching to quote the Bible there? Or is it just preaching if you disagree with what is being said?


Like this comment
Posted by District Teacher
a resident of San Ramon
on Apr 18, 2016 at 3:02 pm

Marie,

Instead of spending the time giving you a history education, simply Google "how the bible was used to support slavery" and you will find multiple examples and direct quotes from the bible that were indeed used for that very purpose. Here's a small sample: "They asked who could question the Word of God when it said, "slaves, obey your earthly masters with fear and trembling" (Ephesians 6:5), or "tell slaves to be submissive to their masters and to give satisfaction in every respect" (Titus 2:9)."

Oh, I'm sorry. Is it preaching to quote the Bible there? Or is it just preaching if you disagree with what is being said?


Like this comment
Posted by SHale99
a resident of another community
on Apr 18, 2016 at 3:18 pm

SHale99 is a registered user.

Marie: Schools should spend more time on 'sex ed' and I'm afraid today that means those who are gay. I also 'feel' that pulling a child out for a week (or even a day) is an overreaction. Pretty sure the article stated other accommodations would be made available for children who would not be attending the event(s).
And if you are really that unhappy with the district, you have plenty of options beyond this very safe forum to 'do' something about it beyond complaining.


9 people like this
Posted by Sue Thayer
a resident of another community
on Apr 18, 2016 at 3:35 pm

False equivalence is a tool of bigotry.

Here's the difference between Springsteen not in NC and a devoutly bigoted baker in, say, CA. In THIS state, the people have chosen to forbid discriminating against customers on the basis of race, sex, sexual orientation and several other immutable characteristics -- and religion, which really IS a choice, but we include it anyway (weakly, compared to other chars). "No shirt, no shoes" and the like are not included on that short list, so a merchant is free to boot customers on those and most other bases. Many others states have similar laws; NC may not. Here have made a public (dare I say moral) judgment that status-based discrimination is "wrong."

Bruce is opting out of doing business in NC because of its legislature's ridiculously pre-adolescent preoccupation with all things potty. He's not discriminating; he's choosing not to go there and transact his business. The devoutly bigoted baker clearly IS discriminating against somebody in refusing to do his business because s/he thinks a customer is gay, which may be true (it doesn't really matter if it's true, once that's the basis for discriminating). Of course, he may also choose not to transact business at all, if to do so might somehow really transgress the 'values' taught in his 'loving faith' -- he just can't pick and choose on any of those several status bases.

It's not that hard, but if you have difficulty, just try substituting black or female for gay or transgender, and then see if you think it's okay to discriminate. It's not. Ever.


2 people like this
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on Apr 19, 2016 at 7:35 am

Herman Glates is a registered user.

Remember when school used to be about reading, writing, and arithmetic?

If you want to discuss bullying in general, great.

But why give special attention to LGBT?


13 people like this
Posted by Susan
a resident of San Ramon
on Apr 19, 2016 at 9:16 am

This "special day" is actually outdated. Most students are totally fine with accepting all students and really don't think in terms of "gay" or "straight". Being in the district I know that this is pushed by a few gay teachers, many in leadership roles in the union, who are holding on to, and wanting to preserve an image of prosecution. The event actually sets back the progress that has been made in accepting all students, without judgement. it is disappointing that the board could not see this reality, but given their relationship (and fear) of the union this is what we get.


4 people like this
Posted by Sue Thayer
a resident of another community
on Apr 19, 2016 at 10:16 am

... Glates, in case you're seriously confused, it's the same reason Willie Sutton said he robbed banks -- "because that's where the money is." Perhaps in a perfect world of unlimited resources, time and attention, we could protect The Popular Kids, too, from being bullied. Until then, resources ought to go where the problem is located.

I agree with Susan that the HS population is much more accepting than the senior center, but if you look at the stats, gay kids are much more deeply and too-often suicide-ally impacted by bullying. Good show, school.


Like this comment
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on Apr 19, 2016 at 11:57 am

Herman Glates is a registered user.

This ain’t about the kids.

This is about your agenda.

The kids are just pawns. If you were truly worried about the kids, you’d talk about divorce for a week. Divorce is the main reason kids suffer from depression and suicide.


4 people like this
Posted by Sue Thayer
a resident of another community
on Apr 19, 2016 at 12:11 pm

Ah, yes. A claim without attribution because everybody knows it's true. BTW, I was absent when They passed out The Agendas. Perhaps you have a copy you could point us to?

Also, I don't think you'd talk about divorce, but about marriage and the life skills that undergird a good one. Personally, I think that'd be time well-spent, consistent with the 3 Rs. But I suspect Your real Agenda is to try to drive the possibilities too far, in service to your preference for doing nothing.

Good work, school.


8 people like this
Posted by collins
a resident of Danville
on Apr 19, 2016 at 1:06 pm

Glates.....

Bullying is alive and well in our fair town. I have a transgender son who was bullied so much he is now on home study.

It is my belief that this will not end until the supposed adults stop making comments, not just in front of the children, but anywhere. The ignorance about transgenders abounds! I agree that most students are very aware of LBGTQ issues, I just hope it will one day be safe for my child to go back to High School!


2 people like this
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on Apr 19, 2016 at 1:24 pm

Herman Glates is a registered user.

Welcome to the club.

My kid got bullied too.


1 person likes this
Posted by Anne
a resident of Alamo
on Apr 19, 2016 at 2:43 pm

There really is no reason for anyone to get snarky.This is supposed to be a discussion in which we are "respectful and truthful".
This insulting and/or insistence on "my way or the highway" position is a major reason why politics has become a blood sport.
Can we keep this civil,please???


10 people like this
Posted by LAC
a resident of Danville
on Apr 20, 2016 at 6:25 am

Where is the week of silence for the men and women in the military that are serving our country? The purpose of school is to educate not push ANY social agenda. No wonder our public school systems are failing our young people. They are turning out kids with opinions like these in this interview. This country is in big trouble.


Web Link


2 people like this
Posted by Sue Thayer
a resident of another community
on Apr 20, 2016 at 9:09 am

This will be heretical to some worshipers, but I believe there is no shortage of public appreciation shown for the sacrifices of our military personnel -- and that's how it should be.

That said, there is utterly no basis for presenting the false choice of one or the other. None. They are unrelated. And LAC, if anybody has an 'agenda,' it is the cro magnon lobby striving in vain to hold back the tide of human progress that's running positively in the direction of accepting other people's differences. It cannot succeed, and they may as well just retreat to their caves.

BTW, every generation since Socrates has bemoaned the impending end of all civilization that is certain to follow as the next generation takes over. That's not to say it won't happen someday, but there have been more than 120 generations since that time, and it hasn't happened yet. You might want to relax.


4 people like this
Posted by Christian
a resident of Danville
on Apr 20, 2016 at 9:29 am

@district teacher: Christianity is what ended slavery. The abolitionists were compelled by their faith to act against injustice. I suggest you listen to the song Amazing Grace and Google the history behind it.

My Christian faith is why I believe gays should be treated the way I wish to be treated:fairly and with respect and kindness.


18 people like this
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on Apr 20, 2016 at 9:40 am

Herman Glates is a registered user.

Sue,

When you put strange ideas into kids’ heads, they’ll do things that they otherwise might never have thought to do.

When it comes to my kids, I want to set the moral agenda.

Feel free to teach your morals to your kids on your own time, not at school.


2 people like this
Posted by Sue Thayer
a resident of another community
on Apr 20, 2016 at 10:10 am

Glates: Just like every generation since Socrates, your kids and mine will probably turn-out all right, despite our best parental efforts.


7 people like this
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on Apr 20, 2016 at 11:51 am

Herman Glates is a registered user.

Socrates was put to death for corrupting the youth of Athens.

Be thankful you didn’t live back then.


2 people like this
Posted by Sue Thayer
a resident of another community
on Apr 20, 2016 at 12:19 pm

Lest there be any misunderstanding, he was accused of both "corrupting the Minds of youth" by teaching them to think for themselves and not blindly adhere to what they were told, and of "impiety" for failing to acknowledge the gods that the city fathers preferred.

His story is a lesson in the wrongs too often done by ignorant tyrants and/or in the name of religious intolerance. Those instincts still lurk among corrupt individuals today, some of them quite pious. I think society has made progress since Socrates' day, both in teaching kids to think and stand-up for themselves, and in separating church from state.

I hope you will quit trying to drag us all back through time. It won't work.


12 people like this
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on Apr 20, 2016 at 12:27 pm

Herman Glates is a registered user.

Tomato, Tomotto…

The lesson is, don’t mess with people’s kids.


4 people like this
Posted by Sue Thayer
a resident of another community
on Apr 20, 2016 at 12:47 pm

I am unsurprised that you fail to fathom the fundamental difference. Tomato ... hemlock.

The role of education is to teach young people how to think -- about what they're doing and about respecting others, not just about where the train from Chicago will meet the train from New York.

And not to just accept what their elders tells 'em, but to examine it, test it and see if it works. Your fear of that phenomenon is futile.


7 people like this
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on Apr 20, 2016 at 1:04 pm

Herman Glates is a registered user.

It ain’t your job to teach my kids your version of morality.

My kids are plenty smart.

They’d run circles around a sophist like you.


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