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Realtors vote to support $1.3 billion affordable housing proposal

Association 'recognizes the urgency of California's housing crisis'

Directors of the California Association of Realtors voted recently to support a $1.3 billion proposal by State Assembly members to create affordable housing programs.

"With a historically low home ownership rate of 54% and record-high rental costs, the dream of owning a home in California is evaporating," said CAR president Pat "Ziggy" Zicarelli. "Our teachers, nurses, firefighters, police officers and other middle class workers should be able to afford to live in the communities they serve."

"CAR recognizes the urgency of California's housing crisis and is fully supporting the proposal by the Assembly Housing and Community Development Committee to invest a portion of our state's budget surplus to address this housing crisis," Zicarelli added.

CAR formed an Affordable Workforce Housing Task Force last August to examine existing policies in California designed to expand the availability of "affordable housing" and to make recommendations to increase the availability of affordable work force housing in California.

This budget proposal includes:

$400 million for home-ownership and rental housing opportunities:

* $200 million for a new workforce housing grant program to provide funding for down payment assistance, home ownership assistance and rental housing for individuals making 120% of the area median income.

* $200 million for the CalHome Program, which provides grants and loans to local governments and nonprofit organizations for rehabilitation of existing homes, mortgage assistance, acquisition, site development and pre-development/construction of homes.

$60 million for seismic retrofits of soft-story homes. Personal income tax credits for 30% of qualified cost incurred for a seismic retrofit.

$75 million for farmworker housing:

* $50 million to finance the construction, rehabilitation and acquisition of owner-occupied and rental units for ag workers.

* $25 million for the construction, rehabilitation and acquisition of rental housing for farmworkers and their families who make up to 60% of the area median income.

$500 million for the rental housing for lower income working families:

* $300 million in low-income housing tax credits to enable private developers to create more than 3,000 homes and leverage $300 million in federal tax credits and $600 million of federal tax exempt bonds, which would otherwise go unclaimed.

* $200 million to fund the construction, rehabilitation and acquisition of 5,700 multifamily rental homes, serving 62,500 families and individuals at 60% of the area median income or below.

$300 million for shelter programs:

* $200 million for multifamily supportive housing.

* $60 million for the Medi-Cal Housing Program to provide rental assistance for people who are homeless and enrolled in Medi-Cal.

* $40 million to assist persons at risk of becoming homeless with homeless prevention assistance and rapid rehousing.

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Comments

4 people like this
Posted by Louise
a resident of Danville
on May 10, 2016 at 6:40 pm

What about job training programs and education? If people had right skills and educations they could find jobs and make rental or house payments. Just giving money and debt forgiveness doesn't teach skills to get a job. More money is not the only answer.


3 people like this
Posted by Thomas
a resident of Danville
on May 10, 2016 at 8:43 pm

Do you think city of atherton California's public employees should be able to afford to live in atherton?


4 people like this
Posted by Watching the Watchers
a resident of San Ramon
on May 11, 2016 at 9:41 am

This is a "serious waste" of tax payer funds. And as a tax payer this article is extremely insulting.

The quote from CAR president Pat "Ziggy" Zicarelli. "Our teachers, nurses, firefighters, police officers and other middle class workers should be able to afford to live in the communities they serve."

www.transparentcalifornia.com

If you look into the website above, there are not many "Public Servants" that fall into the category of not being able to afford to take care of themselves and need tax payer handouts.

And, quoting from an article by Jordan Weissmann, Slate.com, "Who Gets To Be "Rich"?

According to World Top Incomes DataBase, a household income of about $113,000 lands you at the top 10th, while $394,000 makes you a bona fide member of the 1 percent. You could reasonably argue that anybody who earns above those thresholds is, in a sense, rich—or at least makes a relatively uncommon amount of money.

This $1.3 billion is just one big tax payer hand-out to the already "affluent".


7 people like this
Posted by Herman Glates
a resident of Danville
on May 12, 2016 at 7:18 am

Herman Glates is a registered user.

This proposal takes money from people who earned it and gives it to people who did not.

If people need something they don’t have, why don’t they just steal it?

It’s the same thing.


5 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of San Ramon
on May 12, 2016 at 9:39 am

to Thomas,

No, not really. just because you work in a certain area doesn't mean you can afford to live there, or should be paid enough to live there.

Here's a novel idea on affordable housing. Get a better job, work two jobs, move to a cheaper area and then guess what???? You may be able to "afford" housing.

How about we all realize there are "rich" neighborhoods where the "rich" live and we all just have to live in other places. It was not my lot in life to live in Atherton, or Hillsborough, or Malibu, or etc. etc. I'm doing well in life and am ok with that concept, why can't the "poor" be ok with that concept also??????


3 people like this
Posted by Kerri
a resident of Danville
on May 12, 2016 at 2:03 pm

Affordable housing is a wonderful way to keep your workforce in the community. Investing in your firefighters, teachers, nurses, etc keeps the community strong. Affordable housing is not a threat to market rate housing, it is quite the opposite. This a strong move by realtors and one that will prop up our communities. Thank you!!


Like this comment
Posted by Progressive
a resident of Danville
on May 12, 2016 at 9:18 pm

The commenters sound like a bunch of entitled spoiled brats. But then what do you expect from the usual suspects. I can't wait to vote for their savior the frumpy Trump, another spoiled brat.


Like this comment
Posted by Resident
a resident of San Ramon
on May 13, 2016 at 8:28 am

Progressive,

Why do you say "entitled" and "spoiled"? How about smart, hard working, dedicated, focused, motivated. Etc etc. Us "rich" people worked for what we have and just don't always understand why others get free stuff, while we worked for it. as a progressive I would assume you believe that "all people are created equally" and "you can be anything in life you want" if you work hard. So, then why do some people get free stuff?


Like this comment
Posted by Scott Hale
a resident of another community
on May 14, 2016 at 9:13 am

Scott Hale is a registered user.

why is it when the middle class owns a home they are termed 'rich'? Perhaps they just work(ed) hard and make ends meet?




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