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Admin items to lead new SRVUSD superintendent's first board meeting

Former San Diego-area administrator moved to the district in July

Rick Schmitt is set for his first school board meeting as San Ramon Valley schools superintendent, with summertime administrative items leading the docket for the morning session Tuesday.

Schmitt, who started the job last month, spent 17 years as a school administrator in the San Diego area, including the previous three as superintendent of San Dieguito Union High School District, based in Encinitas in north-coastal San Diego County. He was hired in May to succeed Mary Shelton once she stepped into retirement at the end of June.

The new superintendent's first board meeting will take place Tuesday morning, with the open session starting at 8:30 a.m. at the district administrative complex, 699 Old Orchard Drive in Danville.

The school board will consider reducing or eliminating employment positions -- amounting to less than half of a full-time job -- due to lack of work or lack of funds.

The positions on the list are 0.167 full-time equivalent (FTE) for an instructional assistant and 0.133 FTE for an instructional assistant in physical education.

Board members will also discuss approving 150-plus new teaching and classified personnel moves related to June or July resignations, new hires, leaves of absence or assignment changes.

The board will consider requesting provisional internship permits for five teaching positions -- a program that replaced the emergency permit program previously offered by the California Commission on Teaching Credentialing.

The one-year permit can be requested after "a diligent search has been conducted and a fully credentialed teacher could not be found," according to district staff.

The board will weigh whether to appoint one of its members as a representative to the Contra Costa County School Boards Association.

Before the public meeting, the board will sit in closed session beginning at 8 a.m. to discuss the appointment of assistant principals at Charlotte Wood Middle School and Quail Run Elementary School, as well as discipline, dismissal or release of unnamed certificated and classified employees.

Board vice president Mark Jewett plans to participate in the entire Tuesday meeting by phone from Twain Harte in Tuolumne County.

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Comments

1 person likes this
Posted by Teacher
a resident of Danville
on Aug 1, 2016 at 8:14 pm

I really hope the new superintendent has great success. MS was a disaster for our district. Admins and teachers were too afraid to express her incompetence due to feared retaliation. Many, many admins and directors left during her tenure. Teachers are turning the corner as admins are now realizing parent threats are unwarranted and invalid, kudos to you admins for starting to support teachers. The kids in this district are great and so are most of the parents. It will be an even greater district if our super starts supporting teachers and learning.


6 people like this
Posted by Sammy Nient
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 1, 2016 at 8:46 pm

It is not true that parent threats are unwarranted and invalid. Administrators and staff members abuse power to save their jobs. MS might not been an able Superintendent, but the people working under her are not completely ethical. If administrators blindly support teachers, God save the kids!


4 people like this
Posted by Jillian Seth
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 2, 2016 at 8:06 pm

Mary Shelton supported the teachers more than the parents. I am not sure how much more support teachers need. They are very powerful in the classroom, and don't respond to parents adequately. I am expected to send my child to school for 10 months, and ask no questions!


1 person likes this
Posted by SHale99
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 5, 2016 at 11:01 am

SHale99 is a registered user.

Jillian: You must mean 'some' teachers do not respond 'adequately' to parents. That is certainly not the rule, aye? I have found teachers respond if the parent is reasonable (at least in the beginning). Get more bees with honey and all that.....

Imagine from the teachers' point of view: UP to 24-30 sets of parents to deal with all with different personalities. Certainly a percent of teachers are quite clueless with communicating with parents. On the other hand their are helicopter parents who are also clueless and quite unreasonable.

It's a give and take situations that requires both ends to be patient and civil, no?


Like this comment
Posted by Jillian Seth
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 5, 2016 at 8:07 pm

The general vs specific rule does not work in this case. We must wonder if power inside a classroom is a factor that influences learning or not.

The classroom is a harsh space at times, but then, why be a teacher if one has not thought through the student- teacher relationship deeply?


2 people like this
Posted by resident 1
a resident of Danville
on Aug 6, 2016 at 7:45 am

Jillian Seth, welcome to the SRVUSD teacher hating club, you will fit right in.


Like this comment
Posted by SHale99
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 6, 2016 at 8:28 am

SHale99 is a registered user.

A teacher must have some sort of of 'power' or the students will take over, aye? Sounds like you have had bad teacher experiences, it happens. I hope you explained to your children they will have teachers they like and they will have teachers they really don't like; gotta get through it.

But, yes, some teachers are a bit confused when they sign up. They don't understand the whole I-don't-work-2080 hours a year like everybody else. they do have to deal with parents and they seem to feel they need job protection even when they can't or won't perform to any default standard. Another thread, I guess.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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