News

Hundreds of demonstrators close streets in non-violent protest in Dublin

Peaceful protest of police brutality, killing of George Floyd was led by police escort & ended at Dublin Civic Center

Hundreds of protesters gathered in Dublin on Monday, speaking out in opposition to racism, police brutality and the killing of George Floyd. (Photo by Ryan J. Degan)

Hundreds of protesters shut down the streets in central Dublin on Monday afternoon, as Tri-Valley residents joined the numerous communities throughout the country that have risen up in protests against police brutality.

Inspired by the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis on Memorial Day, Dublin protesters came out in a show of solidarity against police brutality, racism and complacency toward injustice.

Dublin resident and event organizer Hannah Keihl said she "doesn't speak for everyone in the group," but to her the protest was "really a way to fight against the complacency that I can feel in myself and the community regarding black lives, regarding police, regarding injustice."

Primarily led and organized by local youth activists, Hannah explained that the protest's leaders met organically online and came together out of a desire to do something about the current situation unfolding across the country.

Protesters blocked off the intersection where Dublin Boulevard meets Dougherty Road, for an eight minute moment of silence. (Photo by Ryan J. Degan)

"We're a group of organizers, no one person has contributed more or less than the others," she added. "It's been a cooperative effort from people who are also Dublin residents to have a show of solidarity that police brutality violence aren't limited to larger cities, that Dublin is no exception and to have a show of solidarity even in the suburbs."

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Prior to the start of the march -- which took participants from Emerald Glen Park to the Dublin Civic Center and police station -- organizers held a rally where local leaders and advocates shared inspiring words and reviewed the plan for the day.

During the rally organizers gave instructions and advice to those in attendance, strictly informing protesters that this was a non-violent gathering and any counter protesters attempting to cause trouble should be ignored.

Organizers further provided attendees with water, snacks and masks -- also recommending that those in attendance follow social-distancing as much as possible, in order to curtail any spread of COVID-19.

Dublin Mayor David Haubert was one of the local leaders in attendance at the rally -- also joining the protests for a part of the march -- and briefly addressed attendees before the march began.

"I have been in contact with many mayors and colleagues around the country and in close contact with every mayor here in Alameda County and certainly in the Tri-Valley, we are all disgusted at what happened to George Floyd. We all recognize that is not what we are about anywhere here and we decry that activity," Haubert said. "To the people that are here protesting for positive change, ending racism, furthering social justice and wiping out social inequality, we support that in a peaceful way. We hear you, we stand with you."

Local police provided escort for the protest, clearing streets of cars so the procession could have safe passage. (Photo by Ryan J. Degan)

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Addressing reports of looting that have occurred throughout the Bay Area and country, Haubert added: "The last thing that I have to say is, if anybody is here or later this afternoon is here for other reasons to do harm or otherwise detract from that positive message, then I would ask them to go home. This is not a place for them to be."

After the rally protesters took to the streets, chanting rallying cries of "Black Lives Matter", "No Justice No Peace" and yelling the name of George Floyd.

As opposed to some other demonstrations in the Bay Area and throughout the country that resulted in looting and police violence, Dublin's gathering was a peaceful one and included a police escort courtesy of Dublin Police Services personnel, who closed roadways in advance of the procession.

After nearly an hour of marching and chanting, protesters arrived at the Dublin Boulevard-Dougherty Road intersection, where they took over the street and held an eight-minute moment of silence to represent the amount of time Floyd suffocated while Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck.

While there the procession was met with several lines of local and county police officers, who blocked protesters' access to Interstate-680. Protesters attempted to convince these officers to take a knee with them, however police did not respond to these requests.

After the moment of silence, the procession continued its advance to the Dublin Civic Center and Police Station, where protesters continued chants, before eventually dispersing and heading their separate ways.

There are at least two more Tri-Valley protests planned for this current week, Wednesday in San Ramon protesters will gather at 5 p.m. at the Gale Ranch Plaza, 11000 Bollinger Canyon Road, for a march to City Hall, 7000 Bollinger Canyon Road. Pleasanton residents will also have their chance for a hometown protest at 2 p.m. on Friday, when protesters gather for a march in front of the Amador Valley High School Theater, 1155 Santa Rita Road.

Talking to residents who may want to support the protests, but is unable to attend one in person due to concerns over the coronavirus or other issues, Denel McMahan, President of the Dublin High School Black Student Union, advised residents to stay informed and keep talking about the issues.

"Continue posting about it (on social media) and continue learning about it. Become aware and then if you meet anyone who is trying to learn about it you can spread information as well," McMahan said.

"I'm here to protest police brutality that's been happening frequently for the past seven years and I feel that it's about time that people recognize it and everyone's unites to fight against it. I'm here to be a part of that," he added.

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Hundreds of demonstrators close streets in non-violent protest in Dublin

Peaceful protest of police brutality, killing of George Floyd was led by police escort & ended at Dublin Civic Center

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Mon, Jun 1, 2020, 8:59 pm
Updated: Tue, Jun 2, 2020, 12:55 pm

Hundreds of protesters shut down the streets in central Dublin on Monday afternoon, as Tri-Valley residents joined the numerous communities throughout the country that have risen up in protests against police brutality.

Inspired by the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis on Memorial Day, Dublin protesters came out in a show of solidarity against police brutality, racism and complacency toward injustice.

Dublin resident and event organizer Hannah Keihl said she "doesn't speak for everyone in the group," but to her the protest was "really a way to fight against the complacency that I can feel in myself and the community regarding black lives, regarding police, regarding injustice."

Primarily led and organized by local youth activists, Hannah explained that the protest's leaders met organically online and came together out of a desire to do something about the current situation unfolding across the country.

"We're a group of organizers, no one person has contributed more or less than the others," she added. "It's been a cooperative effort from people who are also Dublin residents to have a show of solidarity that police brutality violence aren't limited to larger cities, that Dublin is no exception and to have a show of solidarity even in the suburbs."

Prior to the start of the march -- which took participants from Emerald Glen Park to the Dublin Civic Center and police station -- organizers held a rally where local leaders and advocates shared inspiring words and reviewed the plan for the day.

During the rally organizers gave instructions and advice to those in attendance, strictly informing protesters that this was a non-violent gathering and any counter protesters attempting to cause trouble should be ignored.

Organizers further provided attendees with water, snacks and masks -- also recommending that those in attendance follow social-distancing as much as possible, in order to curtail any spread of COVID-19.

Dublin Mayor David Haubert was one of the local leaders in attendance at the rally -- also joining the protests for a part of the march -- and briefly addressed attendees before the march began.

"I have been in contact with many mayors and colleagues around the country and in close contact with every mayor here in Alameda County and certainly in the Tri-Valley, we are all disgusted at what happened to George Floyd. We all recognize that is not what we are about anywhere here and we decry that activity," Haubert said. "To the people that are here protesting for positive change, ending racism, furthering social justice and wiping out social inequality, we support that in a peaceful way. We hear you, we stand with you."

Addressing reports of looting that have occurred throughout the Bay Area and country, Haubert added: "The last thing that I have to say is, if anybody is here or later this afternoon is here for other reasons to do harm or otherwise detract from that positive message, then I would ask them to go home. This is not a place for them to be."

After the rally protesters took to the streets, chanting rallying cries of "Black Lives Matter", "No Justice No Peace" and yelling the name of George Floyd.

As opposed to some other demonstrations in the Bay Area and throughout the country that resulted in looting and police violence, Dublin's gathering was a peaceful one and included a police escort courtesy of Dublin Police Services personnel, who closed roadways in advance of the procession.

After nearly an hour of marching and chanting, protesters arrived at the Dublin Boulevard-Dougherty Road intersection, where they took over the street and held an eight-minute moment of silence to represent the amount of time Floyd suffocated while Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck.

While there the procession was met with several lines of local and county police officers, who blocked protesters' access to Interstate-680. Protesters attempted to convince these officers to take a knee with them, however police did not respond to these requests.

After the moment of silence, the procession continued its advance to the Dublin Civic Center and Police Station, where protesters continued chants, before eventually dispersing and heading their separate ways.

There are at least two more Tri-Valley protests planned for this current week, Wednesday in San Ramon protesters will gather at 5 p.m. at the Gale Ranch Plaza, 11000 Bollinger Canyon Road, for a march to City Hall, 7000 Bollinger Canyon Road. Pleasanton residents will also have their chance for a hometown protest at 2 p.m. on Friday, when protesters gather for a march in front of the Amador Valley High School Theater, 1155 Santa Rita Road.

Talking to residents who may want to support the protests, but is unable to attend one in person due to concerns over the coronavirus or other issues, Denel McMahan, President of the Dublin High School Black Student Union, advised residents to stay informed and keep talking about the issues.

"Continue posting about it (on social media) and continue learning about it. Become aware and then if you meet anyone who is trying to learn about it you can spread information as well," McMahan said.

"I'm here to protest police brutality that's been happening frequently for the past seven years and I feel that it's about time that people recognize it and everyone's unites to fight against it. I'm here to be a part of that," he added.

Comments

Bill T
Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 6:26 am
Bill T, Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 6:26 am
23 people like this

Why is it that liberal mayors “encourage” giant groups of protesters to gather together for hours to exercise their rights, with no mention fear of covid 19 spread, but same mayors won’t let us gather in church again for one hour of mass to exercise our rights?


Kjgamble
San Ramon
on Jun 2, 2020 at 9:09 am
Kjgamble, San Ramon
on Jun 2, 2020 at 9:09 am
16 people like this

Interesting that a giant public gathering is permitted but people can’t go to church or school or work.


C. R. Mudgeon
Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 1:58 pm
C. R. Mudgeon, Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 1:58 pm
10 people like this

Maybe local churches should start holding marches, and shut down major intersections to get their message across. The message of "Love thy neighbor" seems like a very positive message, that needs to be heard.


Taxpayer
Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 8:38 pm
Taxpayer, Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 8:38 pm
4 people like this

Contra Costa County announced TODAY , June 2 , that they will ease restrictions and allow permits for protests of no more than 100’people. That is unless of course you’re an angry mob or BLM, then you’re free to loot as you please.


Taxpayer
Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 8:39 pm
Taxpayer, Danville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 8:39 pm
2 people like this

Contra Costa County announced TODAY June 2 , that they will ease restrictions and allow permits for protests of no more than 100’people. That is unless of course you’re an angry mob or BLM, then you’re free to loot as you please.


Jordan
Danville
on Jun 3, 2020 at 8:28 am
Jordan, Danville
on Jun 3, 2020 at 8:28 am
10 people like this

Dear Taxpayer - No one is saying people are free to loot as you please. But if you try to prevent peaceful protesters, all that is left is the riots and looters. Cities are taking a health risk by allowing large gatherings, but it is nothing compared to the risk of what happens when you silence a movement.

Dear Church-goers - The inability to gather at church is entirely unrelated to the issues happening now. Imagine the sacrifices Jesus would make to lift up those who need help. Our black communities need help now.


My Countrymen
San Ramon
on Jun 3, 2020 at 12:41 pm
My Countrymen, San Ramon
on Jun 3, 2020 at 12:41 pm
Like this comment

These are trying times for our Nation. Covid 19, Employment rates high, Continual Fighting amongst ourselves. We’re like family members who can’t get along. Sad! The Good Book commands us to LOVE one another “Little Children”. My prayers go out to George Floyd’s family and all those who feel disenfranchised and have a feeling of loss and are emotionally drained! Everyone wants to be right in moments like these. Please try to understand, it’s most difficult to live in a society where you’re not looked upon as being human. The ugliness of racism unfortunately will most likely be an ugly scab on Our Country until the end of time. We must continue to Fight the Good Fight, to rid ourselves of the horribleness of it all. My Father once spoke to me about being in war. This was at a time when our military was segregated. He was in WWII and the Korean War. His words to me, “at the end of the day, once in battle, it really didn’t matter the color of the man who fought with you, what mattered is you knew he had your back.” Do we really have each other’s backs, because it seems as though we’re in battle with one another? Please, fellow countrymen, let’s not allow the ugliness of racism to rip us apart. If we MUST protest, let us protest with Honor and in memory of those you have loss their lives, pass and present. May our Lord be with you all. (In memory of my beloved Father- Died Veterans Day)


Bill T
Danville
on Jun 3, 2020 at 1:32 pm
Bill T, Danville
on Jun 3, 2020 at 1:32 pm
2 people like this

To Jordan: As to your comment that "the inability to gather at church is entirely unrelated to the issues happening now" shows your bias and lack of empathy for those who consider attending church service "essential". People of color are angry and protesting as they feel they are not valued and their rights are not protected and they are not treated equally, just like Christians in the Bay Area feel they are not valued and their rights are not protected and they are not treated equally by politicians and people like you.


human1
another community
on Jun 3, 2020 at 1:36 pm
human1, another community
on Jun 3, 2020 at 1:36 pm
2 people like this

A couple points, one about peaceful protests and another about rioting:

There is a night and day difference between peaceful protests and rioting. The latter should be dealt with a firm hand. Unfortunately, the majority of folks who were in a position to condemn violence and put an end to it, didn't do enough. Let law enforcement (and others if needed) do their jobs to make our communities safe from rioters; enough is enough.

As for peaceful protests, hopefully they trigger an honest conversation; the keyword being 'honest'. Yes there are bad apples in law enforcement and bigoted people in every community, and that needs to be called out/discussed/dealt with. But labeling an entire system corrupt and bigoted is far from the truth and serves no purpose. There are plenty of folks in this country from many parts of the world for whom the system does work; nothing was handed to them for free. Constructively criticizing a system is only one part of the equation; the other part is self-appraisal to understand where the individual is lacking and then make necessary corrections.


Jordan
Danville
on Jun 4, 2020 at 7:46 am
Jordan, Danville
on Jun 4, 2020 at 7:46 am
Like this comment

Dear Bill T - I ask that you please consider the time and place for these comments. When major issues need to be solved, efforts need to be focused. I never (and would never) try to overshadow any feeling that Christians have regarding their rights. In an article related to that concern, I would wholeheartedly support that by keeping the topic related to that issue. As this article is specifically about protesting police brutality in America, let us please focus on that here.


Bill T
Danville
on Jun 4, 2020 at 9:24 am
Bill T, Danville
on Jun 4, 2020 at 9:24 am
4 people like this

Jordan: You really need to attend some diversity training, and work on your inability to have empathy and respect for Christians. Your underlying hatred is coming out for the world to see.

Your attempt to define this issue, by solely looking at it thru your eyeglass, is disturbing. You, apparently as judge and jury, and editor of what can be discussed, want to focus on "protesting police brutality". For argument sake, if we stay 100% on only what you want to discuss, still brings us back to my initial point, that you refuse to even consider. The so called "Progressive" mayors and our so called "Progressive" Governor, never closed marijuana shops, during the pandemic, but still will not let us attend mass in person. Those same mayors and Governor, however, when the issue is something on their political playbook, i.e., police brutality, will suddenly ignore the alleged health concerns prohibiting us from attending our essential church services, and suddenly allow hundreds and thousands of protesters to gather in person, for hours, in close proximity, with no enforcement of the pandemic restrictions.

Treating people of color differently, not having empathy for their plight, treating them differently under the law, and not respecting them, is absolutely wrong, and has caused wide spread protest and unrest. Treating Christians in the liberal Bay Area differently, not having empathy for their plight, treating them differently under the law, and not respecting them, is absolutely wrong. You do not see the difference as in the Bay Area our politicians and many citizens like you treat Christians without respect, and love to mock us, and ignore our feelings. Remember, when President Obama was caught saying white people "cling to their religion and guns", how do you think that made us feel? Disrespected, treated unfairly, and our rights violated. Why do you think the so-called "comedy" Book of Mormon is such a hit in the Bay Area, as people like you love to ridicule organized Christian religions. What would happen if someone tried to start a comedy in the Bay Area called Book of Koran, making fun of a non-Christian religion? It would last about a day before protesters would shut it down.

Sorry, Jordan, but if you can not have empathy for those with different values and faiths than you, you are no better than the police officers you are protesting against.


Jennifer
Danville
on Jun 5, 2020 at 8:46 am
Jennifer, Danville
on Jun 5, 2020 at 8:46 am
10 people like this

There is no excuse for police brutality, and no excuse for resisting arrest. When will suspects of all cultures learn to cooperate with the police? The first thing a police officer will look for is attitude. Problem solved.


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