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Historic charm

Pleasanton Heritage Association honors homes that add character to downtown

Pleasanton Heritage Association is honoring five downtown homes by presenting their owners with 2021 Historic Preservation Awards. Each year, five to six homes are chosen for the recognition from among the 93 that the city has designated as historic resources.

This year's homes were built between 1898-90 and 1940: 690 Division St.; 4318 Second St.; 670 St. John St.; 471 St. Mary St.; and 4653 Third St.

4653 Third St., one of the five 2021 award winners. (Photos by Brian Borg and George Garbarino)

The association has placed a sign in each of the yards for passersby to see, and bronze plaques are being made for the fronts of the homes. Owners will also be given an original rendering of the home by artist Gary Winter as well as one of his miniature wooden replicas.

"We visit the houses individually and hang the plaques and give them a gift basket with Gary's rendering and miniature. Gourmet Works donates a Pleasanton sign in chocolate," said PHA president Linda Garbarino.

The annual event usually includes a recognition and celebration at Museum on Main but, due to COVID, it will not be held again this year.

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"We hope to be back, live, at the Museum on Main next year for our full reception and celebration of the great historic homes of Pleasanton," Garbarino said. "We always have a lot of dignitaries there, and families love it."

For the last few years, members of the Pleasanton Heritage Association have voted on which homes to honor but this time the committee chose five of the runners-up from previous years, Garbarino said.

"We selected five of the second-place winners and decided to honor them," she explained. "We thought, let's do that and then we can start with a clean slate."

So far, about 25 of the 93 designated historic homes have been recognized, but Garbarino said the city has agreed to look at the list again and perhaps add to it.

"The firm that did the certification had an artificial cutoff of being built in 1942, but there are a lot of homes built between 1942 and 20 years after that that are eligible to be designated historic resources," she said.

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Garbarino, who lives in an 1895 home on Division Street, explained that people who buy historic homes view themselves as being responsible for their heritage, concerned about maintaining the exterior architecture as well as the integrity of the interior.

"We've been in this house for 38-40 years and feel we are the temporary owners, the caregivers of the house," she said. "The house will live well beyond us."

The Pleasanton Heritage Association helps potential buyers understand the municipal codes.

If repairs or improvements are needed, it can provide owners with proven resources and local architects experienced in vintage and historic home renovation.

"Each owner has a city planning staff versed in the process of adding onto or modifying these homes while preserving their integrity," Garbarino said.

"We're really the temporary caregivers of historic homes that we know we'll pass on to the next generations," she added. "We like to retain the uniqueness and small-town quality of Pleasanton, which is why so many travel groups have designated us a destination city."

2021 Pleasanton Historic Preservation Award winners

690 Division St.

690 Division St., one of the five 2021 award winners. (Photos by Brian Borg and George Garbarino)

This split-level home was constructed in 1940, by Edwin and Amy Orloff, co-owners of the Hansen and Orloff dairy of Pleasanton. The residence is a well-preserved example of an Early Ranch style home. The property features brick cladding, stucco finish and imitation red clay tile roofing. The current owners are Alan and Christine Robinette.

4318 Second St.

4318 Second St., one of the five 2021 award winners. (Photos by Brian Borg and George Garbarino)

A single-story Bungalow with Craftsman details, this home was built in 1928 by Joseph and Mary Joseph. Joseph was a teamster for the Spring Valley Irrigation Co. The property features many characteristics of the Bungalow style including a low-pitched hipped roof and a square columned porch on solid balustrade stucco cladding. The current owners are Michael and Rebecca Duret.

670 St. John St.

670 St. John St., one of the five 2021 award winners. (Photos by Brian Borg and George Garbarino)

This single-story Spanish Colonial Revival was constructed in 1930 by Manuel and Marian Rose. Manuel was a laborer in one of the local gravel pits. The property features cross-cable roofing, red clay tile roofing, arched window and door openings, and stucco cladding. The current owner is Susan Garman.

471 St. Mary St.

471 St. Mary St., one of the five 2021 award winners. (Photos by Brian Borg and George Garbarino)

A two-story Colonial Revival Style originally built on Rose Avenue between 1898 and 1900, this home was moved to its current location in 1978, after the creation of Peters Avenue. The home served as a rectory for the newly formed Catholic Community and the St. Augustine's Parish. The property features a wrap-around attached porch, column supports with hipped roofing and bay windows, and a series of single-story additions. The current owners are John Karsner and Judith Pals.

4653 Third St.

4653 Third St., one of the five 2021 award winners. (Photos by Brian Borg and George Garbarino)

This single-story, end-gable Bungalow with Craftsman detailing was constructed in 1915. Ole and Christine Oleson (Olesen) were the first owners. Ole worked as a cabinetmaker and dealer and operated Olesen's Furniture Store on Main Street. The property features a partial-length front porch with a gable roof and square posts. The current owner is Phoebe Suu.

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Historic charm

Pleasanton Heritage Association honors homes that add character to downtown

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, Oct 21, 2021, 3:30 pm

Pleasanton Heritage Association is honoring five downtown homes by presenting their owners with 2021 Historic Preservation Awards. Each year, five to six homes are chosen for the recognition from among the 93 that the city has designated as historic resources.

This year's homes were built between 1898-90 and 1940: 690 Division St.; 4318 Second St.; 670 St. John St.; 471 St. Mary St.; and 4653 Third St.

The association has placed a sign in each of the yards for passersby to see, and bronze plaques are being made for the fronts of the homes. Owners will also be given an original rendering of the home by artist Gary Winter as well as one of his miniature wooden replicas.

"We visit the houses individually and hang the plaques and give them a gift basket with Gary's rendering and miniature. Gourmet Works donates a Pleasanton sign in chocolate," said PHA president Linda Garbarino.

The annual event usually includes a recognition and celebration at Museum on Main but, due to COVID, it will not be held again this year.

"We hope to be back, live, at the Museum on Main next year for our full reception and celebration of the great historic homes of Pleasanton," Garbarino said. "We always have a lot of dignitaries there, and families love it."

For the last few years, members of the Pleasanton Heritage Association have voted on which homes to honor but this time the committee chose five of the runners-up from previous years, Garbarino said.

"We selected five of the second-place winners and decided to honor them," she explained. "We thought, let's do that and then we can start with a clean slate."

So far, about 25 of the 93 designated historic homes have been recognized, but Garbarino said the city has agreed to look at the list again and perhaps add to it.

"The firm that did the certification had an artificial cutoff of being built in 1942, but there are a lot of homes built between 1942 and 20 years after that that are eligible to be designated historic resources," she said.

Garbarino, who lives in an 1895 home on Division Street, explained that people who buy historic homes view themselves as being responsible for their heritage, concerned about maintaining the exterior architecture as well as the integrity of the interior.

"We've been in this house for 38-40 years and feel we are the temporary owners, the caregivers of the house," she said. "The house will live well beyond us."

The Pleasanton Heritage Association helps potential buyers understand the municipal codes.

If repairs or improvements are needed, it can provide owners with proven resources and local architects experienced in vintage and historic home renovation.

"Each owner has a city planning staff versed in the process of adding onto or modifying these homes while preserving their integrity," Garbarino said.

"We're really the temporary caregivers of historic homes that we know we'll pass on to the next generations," she added. "We like to retain the uniqueness and small-town quality of Pleasanton, which is why so many travel groups have designated us a destination city."

690 Division St.

This split-level home was constructed in 1940, by Edwin and Amy Orloff, co-owners of the Hansen and Orloff dairy of Pleasanton. The residence is a well-preserved example of an Early Ranch style home. The property features brick cladding, stucco finish and imitation red clay tile roofing. The current owners are Alan and Christine Robinette.

4318 Second St.

A single-story Bungalow with Craftsman details, this home was built in 1928 by Joseph and Mary Joseph. Joseph was a teamster for the Spring Valley Irrigation Co. The property features many characteristics of the Bungalow style including a low-pitched hipped roof and a square columned porch on solid balustrade stucco cladding. The current owners are Michael and Rebecca Duret.

670 St. John St.

This single-story Spanish Colonial Revival was constructed in 1930 by Manuel and Marian Rose. Manuel was a laborer in one of the local gravel pits. The property features cross-cable roofing, red clay tile roofing, arched window and door openings, and stucco cladding. The current owner is Susan Garman.

471 St. Mary St.

A two-story Colonial Revival Style originally built on Rose Avenue between 1898 and 1900, this home was moved to its current location in 1978, after the creation of Peters Avenue. The home served as a rectory for the newly formed Catholic Community and the St. Augustine's Parish. The property features a wrap-around attached porch, column supports with hipped roofing and bay windows, and a series of single-story additions. The current owners are John Karsner and Judith Pals.

4653 Third St.

This single-story, end-gable Bungalow with Craftsman detailing was constructed in 1915. Ole and Christine Oleson (Olesen) were the first owners. Ole worked as a cabinetmaker and dealer and operated Olesen's Furniture Store on Main Street. The property features a partial-length front porch with a gable roof and square posts. The current owner is Phoebe Suu.

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