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DeSaulnier presents county supervisors with funds to train police on youth interaction

Original post made on Aug 8, 2023

U.S. Rep. Mark DeSaulnier presented the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors last week a $1.18 million check from the federal government meant to train police on 'adolescent development and effective youth interaction.'

Read the full story here Web Link posted Monday, August 7, 2023, 9:54 PM

Comments (18)

Posted by Malcolm Hex
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 8, 2023 at 10:06 am

Malcolm Hex is a registered user.

Here’s what DeSaulnier stated:

“We're really a model in this state and around the country for thoughtful intervention and prevention.”

Meanwhile crime is off the hook in California but this clown wants to give himself a pat on the back. LOL!!! I guess DeSaulnier thinks that because he represents an area that has low crime, therefore his “model” works.

Meanwhile, crime continues to spike in surrounding areas but DeSaulier, like most politicians, offers no real solutions.


Posted by Fuquanda Harris
a resident of another community
on Aug 8, 2023 at 1:04 pm

Fuquanda Harris is a registered user.

This program is a step in the right direction and should be expanded to improving police interaction with people of color and the homeless population.

Kudos to Congressman DeSaulnier for promoting police reforms that will serve as a betterment to society.


Posted by Malcolm Hex
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 11, 2023 at 12:06 am

Malcolm Hex is a registered user.

Yeah, apparently you’re more concerned about the police than the lawlessness going on all over the Bay Area. You going to blame the police for that too?


Posted by Barry Winslow
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Aug 11, 2023 at 8:19 am

Barry Winslow is a registered user.

Additional community outreach between the police and local youths might help to stem the natural resentment that some adolescents and future adults have towards law enforcement overeach.

By carefully explaining their public responsibilities including the lines that they cannot cross, a better understanding and acceptance of law enforcement could be achieved.

Law enforcement representatives should also clarify that the actions of rogue, excessively violent, and/or blatantly racist police actions are not reflective of police officers as a whole.

"Kudos to Congressman DeSaulnier for promoting police reforms that will serve as a betterment to society."
^ Ditto.




Posted by Francine Waters
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Aug 11, 2023 at 9:32 am

Francine Waters is a registered user.

In certain situations, the police need to exercise better restraint when their lives are not in immediate or direct danger.

This in turn will reduce the number of controversies pertaining to various police actions and unreasonable use of force.


Posted by Malcolm Hex
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 12, 2023 at 10:37 am

Malcolm Hex is a registered user.

From Barry:

“By carefully explaining their public responsibilities including the lines that they cannot cross, a better understanding and acceptance of law enforcement could be achieved.”

The public responsibility of police officers is to enforce the law. Maybe it’s you who should try to learn the role of a police officer. Maybe it’s you who needs to accept what police officers have to deal with. By the way, how’s Oakland and San Francisco looking these days? Your so-called city leaders are failures. But I don’t hear you criticizing them. It’s all too easy for weak minded individuals to blame the police when things start falling apart.

From Francine:

“In certain situations, the police need to exercise better restraint when their lives are not in immediate or direct danger.”

Yeah? What kinds of situations are you talking about? What you said makes absolutely no sense because you can’t show an example. You don’t even know what exigent circumstances are. Try looking at your nearest local police department’s Use of Force policy for a start.



Posted by Herb Dawson
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Aug 12, 2023 at 10:51 am

Herb Dawson is a registered user.

Like most humans, the police are not perfect and they are prone to occasional errors and oversights in judgement.

'Qualified immunity' was implemented to eliminate most claims and accusations of police misconduct.

As a result, law enforcement is pretty much entitled to go about as it pleases providing the misconduct is either covered-up or unreported.

This is to ensure public safety and the seamless operation of its staff.


Posted by Malcolm Hex
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 12, 2023 at 9:00 pm

Malcolm Hex is a registered user.

It doesn’t insure anything, Dawson. You sound like one of those liberal teachers who punish the entire class instead of the student who is responsible for the problem. But, that’s what you liberals do. Take the George Floyd incident as an example. One bad cop does something wrong and you blame all cops. Meanwhile, your stupid liberal policies such as defunding the police have lead to wide spread lawlessness. Yet, you and liberals like you, are the first to scream for a cop when you need one. If that isn’t enough, you make a cowardly statement that law enforcement is pretty much entitled to go about as it pleases providing the misconduct is either covered-up or unreported. Care to weigh that against all the good cops do?

The problem with a coward like you is that you provide no facts in support of your arguments. You obviously know nothing about law enforcement to begin with. Finger pointing is easy when void of fact. I suggest you look at the other side and witness all the good that law enforcement does day in and day out. Have you ever beat on somebody’s chest to bring them back to life? Have you ever delivered Naloxone (Narcan) to bring back a user from a Fentanyl overdose? No, you haven’t. Have you ever been in a firefight against an armed assailant? No you haven’t.

Lies are attempts to hide the truth by willfully denying facts. Fiction, on the other hand, is an attempt to reveal the truth by ignoring facts.









Posted by Tiffany Johanson
a resident of Danville
on Aug 13, 2023 at 8:24 am

Tiffany Johanson is a registered user.

Taking all of these comments into consideration, I would imagine that the ratio of (1) truly outstanding, (2) bad/rogue, and (3) average cops just doing their job follows a bell curve pattern with most police officers falling into the 'average' realm.

On the other hand, we must remind ourselves that police officers are exposed to potentially dangerous situations that most average citizens do not encounter and so certain allowances may have to be made for any oversights on their part.

Temperament is another key consideration and hotheads have no place on any police force along with misogynists, racists, and bigots.

Law enforcement is not an easy job and added discretionary measures should be taken in the hiring and screening process to ensure that the bad apples are not allowed to wear a badge and carry a gun.


Posted by Peter Lawrence
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Aug 13, 2023 at 11:34 am

Peter Lawrence is a registered user.

Most of the police officers that I have encountered are OK and just doing their job but on a couple of occasions I have run into some that were real [removed] (bullies).


Posted by Malcolm Hex
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 14, 2023 at 9:34 am

Malcolm Hex is a registered user.

@Tiffany

You stated that enforcing the law is not an easy job and added discretionary measures should be taken in the screening process when hiring police officers. You’re half way home, but I’m going to help you with the “screening process.”

In California, the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) was established by the Legislature in 1959 to set minimum selection and training standards for California law enforcement. Those standards have increased significantly over the years. In fact, a basic POST Academy runs well over 6 months. However, just to qualify for selection into a POST Academy is very difficult.

First, all applicants must pass a written test in the city (police officers), county (deputy sheriff), state (California Highway Patrol), or other such as BART Police. If the candidates pass the written test, they then move on to a physical agility test. From there, the candidates move on to a pre-background interview to see if they qualify for a PHS (Personal History Statement interview). The PHS is like a resume on steroids; and the interview itself can take easily 2 hours or more.

If the candidates should pass the PHS interview, they are scheduled for a polygraph (which is not mandatory by POST and some jurisdictions have done away with). Upon successfully completing the polygraph, a psychological examination and medical examination must also be passed. The department then decides whether or not to hire the applicant after the last interview- which some cal, the Chief’s Oral.

One other thing to add here: a police officer who wants to lateral to another agency must go through the NDI (National Decertification Index) to see if she/has ever been a problem at another department. POST also has another step in this too.

Should you want to check out the process of hiring a peace officer in writing, check out the POST Background Investigation Manual. It’s free and very informative.

Hope this helps.


Posted by Mallory Driscoll
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Aug 14, 2023 at 12:02 pm

Mallory Driscoll is a registered user.

"In California, the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) was established by the Legislature in 1959 to set minimum selection and training standards for California law enforcement."

@Malcom Hex...do other states outside of CA law enforcement hold themselves to the same stringent standards?

Apparently not and therein lies the problem.


Posted by Malcolm Hex
a resident of San Ramon
on Aug 14, 2023 at 9:02 pm

Malcolm Hex is a registered user.

@Driscoll stated the following:

“Do other states outside of CA law enforcement hold themselves to the same stringent standards? Apparently not and therein lies the problem.”

What do you mean by, “apparently not?” Do tell. Do you know what type of training exists for law enforcement personnel outside of California? I don’t and neither do you.

Being smug with facts is one thing; while being smug without facts is another. Maybe you should direct your angst at folks committing crimes instead of pretending to know the differences in law enforcement training.


Posted by Tristan Manoli
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Aug 15, 2023 at 9:05 am

Tristan Manoli is a registered user.

I think that most people agree and support law enforcement when it comes to protecting society.

The police are also expected to preserve and respect the civil rights of all individuals pending a hearing in a court of law.

Assuming the role of judge, jury, and/or executioner is not a part of their job description.


Posted by Jennifer
a resident of Danville
on Aug 17, 2023 at 3:39 pm

Jennifer is a registered user.

Stay on them Malcom. The police need our support more than ever or no one will want to be a police officer. Blaming the police and not the criminals is sad and pathetic. It's their attitude toward the police that get criminals in trouble.

How about youths not getting in trouble with the law, and if they do cooperate with the police.

The police deal with the criminal element, and they're human.


Posted by Justin Connors
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Aug 19, 2023 at 9:04 am

Justin Connors is a registered user.

A police outreach program that works with troubled youth in Antioch would be a step in the right direction.

The only issue/problem is that the FBI has arrested several Antioch police officers for misconduct involving drug trafficking and sexual harassment.

So why would any youth in Antioch consider the APD to be credible mentors?


Posted by Malcolm Hex
a resident of San Ramon
on Sep 14, 2023 at 11:14 pm

Malcolm Hex is a registered user.

@Justin


You make a good point. But please remember the vast majority of police officers do an incredible job.


Posted by Cyrus Wentworth
a resident of Walnut Creek
on Sep 15, 2023 at 8:45 am

Cyrus Wentworth is a registered user.

Concurring with Mr. Hex...as a matter of fact, many law enforcement officers have come from troubled backgrounds themselves which might explain their interest in pursuing a law enforcement career.


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